MACHINAL

Love for Machinal:

 

Cutting-edge staging for 1928 drama

The fledgling Blank-the-Dog company's production of Sophie Treadwell's 1928 drama "Machinal" seems of-the-moment, and more.

 

"I won't submit," declares a young woman caught in society's gears, though the mechanism seems certain to crush her.

 

A strange and wonderful piece of Expressionistic theater, Sophie Treadwell's 1928 drama "Machinal" seems of-the-moment all over again in a presentation by the fledgling Blank-the-Dog company.

 

Right away, this presentation, directed by Nataki Garrett, conveys a powerful sense of claustrophobia. The stage closure has been rigged to work like an aperture (design by Efren Delgadillo Jr.). At first, it opens only narrowly to offer a glimpse of office workers clustered close together, repetitiously performing tasks. The young protagonist

(Amanda Maria Lorca) must squeeze into the center to take her place. She chokes on her words, gasping for air. Dizzying, kaleidoscopic Images of machinery churn across a video projection (designed by Austin Switzser) in the background."

 

--Daryl H. Miller, Theater Beat (LATIMES)

 

"The new young Blank-The-Dog Theatre Company introduces itself with a strikingly innovative production of Sophie Treadwell's 1928 classic Machinal.  Blank-The-Dog is very fortunate in its brilliant Artistic Director, Nataki Garrett. She is a stunning innovative presence and one to watch. The excellent cast is headed by Amanda Maria Lorca as Helen who dynamically manages the segue from cowed vulnerability to passion.. Efren Delgadillo Jr. designed the powerfully effective set, augmented by Laura Mrozckowski's piercing lighting design."

CurtainUp Los Angeles Review

By Laura Hitchcock

 

 

"Amanda Maria Lorca's Helen is so sexy!"

Garrett's riveting staging! "

-Miriam Jacobson, LA Weekly

TRIPPIN'...LUGGAGE

Love for Trippin':

 

(VENUE 13) **

AMANDA Lorca serves up some fine characterisations of bag-ladies, mall-rats, student stoners and deluded divas...California-centric for an international Fringe audience.

 

THE SCOTSMAN

by Clair Smith